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Facing The Music

Article
Milton Kairnes

A New Year, with new beginnings, and all that.
But don't get your hopes up too much, as Milton Kairnes ponders "making it" in the music industry...

When I grow up I want to be:
a listener
.

Dance music isn't all about the DJs, the artists (the producers),
the promoters, or the heads. It's about the listeners.

The dare I say it ordinary folk who simply listen to, and take inspiration from music. Not to achieve great things, but just to enable them in their everyday lives, if only for a fleeting moment.
The favourite song on the radio, the hands-in-the-air euphoric (pilled up) anthem, the track for the wedding list - or funeral, which ever comes first.

Certainly in the past I have possessed grand gestures of "making it" with in the music industry, but what can I say?
Life throws a few challenges at you, you attend perhaps one too many drug infested parties, opportunities pass you by.
But you never stop listening. Listening to the music, and in turn loving it. Isn't that enough to be part of it?

I've stood outside Fabric flyering at 6am in February. I've been objectified by perverse nightclub managers and record label moguls, all while trying to do a decent job. I even got thrown in a Croatian jail for five nights, and all I did was attend a music festival.
So please excuse me if I decide i'm better off sitting back and listening, and maybe having the occasional dance and a few Garys.

Of course, no one really wants to accept the probability that you won't make it (or that there is in fact very little money in dance music). I already know of far too many people who have succumbed to the desire of self-stratospheric stardom. And I don't mean that negatively, not entirely, for even if you seized the opportunity when it arose, or whether it was handed to you on a plate, industry changes, and the opportunities that you present may no longer be relevant.

But still, there will be those who remain that listened and who care just as much about the music as you do. They just have some other day job instead. And a salary. And a half decent pension plan. Which let's face it, you probably won't need because you'll be a bloated cocaine addict by forty, verging on a heart attack.

Just for the record, my love of music, and knowledge there of is something I carry with me at all times. Although unrecognized by the latest online poll of who's who in dance music, for myself it stands as a musical autobiography that I didn't buy, produce or promote.
I listened.

So this goes out to all the listeners - there's nothing wrong with sitting back and enjoying the music. Just don't give up the day job.

Thanks for listening.